The exam vs essay feeling

For anyone who has spent a significant amount of time in education, this feeling will be familiar. You know the one – you have an essay deadline on the horizon and you’ve barely started, but you also have an exam looming and need to revise. Which do you do first? You feel like you have no time for either and consequently go round in circles, getting more stressed that you’re running out of time and failing to do anything productive.

This is me at the moment. All the big things were prepared / bought for the baby months ago, but I still have to buy / organise / pack the little things. I am 36+2 today, so really need to have ‘just in case’ bags packed; I’m going to pack a birthing bag and a post-birth bag, both of which will be useful at home to have everything to hand but then also all contained if we need to transfer to hospital.

I also need to tidy and clean the house, which is presenting itself as a major difficulty right now as I am so exhausted and unable to do simple things like reach the floor (!), crouch down, kneel down, lift things or general do anything physical as it leaves me breathless and sweating.

So, I guess all there is to do is make lists…! Green = packed. Orange = bought but not packed yet. Red = need to buy. Oh god. Update 27/10/13… everything is finally bought, and nearly everything is packed. The only things not packed are labour related, which as I’m planning a home birth, I’ve got out ready to start labouring at home. If we have to transfer, they’ll just be bundled into a bag.

Birthing bag

  • Bikini top
  • Dressing gown
  • Slippers
  • Socks
  • Cheap night shirt / large t-shirt
  • TENS machine
  • Music (ipod)
  • Clary sage / carrier oil
  • Flannel
  • Lip balm
  • Hair bobbles
  • Paracetamol
  • Chocolate / other snacks
  • Water bottle
  • Bottle of squash

Post-birth bag

  • Open-fronted PJs (or similar for easy breastfeeding access)
  • Nightshirt (in case of catheter in hospital)
  • MASSIVE pants! (Including 1 pack of disposables)
  • Maternity pads (2 packs)
  • Dark towels
  • Nursing bras
  • Breast pads (pack of disposables)
  • Lanisoh (going to ask MW for a prescription if needed – have a sachet for emergencies)
  • Comfy outfit to go home in
  • Toiletries (toothbrush, soap, shampoo etc)
  • Deodorant

Changing bag – all baby stuff

  • Changing mat
  • Nappies (starting with disposable)
  • Cotton wool
  • Wipes
  • Muslins
  • Hat
  • Scratch mitts
  • Babygrows – in different sizes
  • Vests – ditto
  • Blanket
  • Snowsuit / jacket

Time flies…

Wow, time really does fly when you’re having fun (or is that when you’re working your backside off, trying to ignore the pain, and suffering with insomnia?)

33+4 today. I have 4.5 days left at work before maternity leave starts, and it can’t come soon enough! The sciatica has unfortunately got worse; last weekend I did far too much walking and driving on both days and by Sunday night, I needed a crutch to walk anywhere. I’ve had to continue using it all week, but am hoping that a weekend of complete rest will make a big difference and hopefully I’ll manage my last week at work relatively crutch-free!

So what is a girl to do with a weekend of ‘rest’? Online shopping is bound to be the answer…

I haven’t really bought many more things since I posted my last brain organising entry. A few things have arrived or been found; we’ve bought a lovely teal black-out blind for the nursery which hubby will put up (eventually…!) and I also found the sling that my sister had given us – a lovely stretchy Hugabub wrap. The changing bag has a waterproof-ish section, but I think I’d like to get a proper waterproof bag as well – the iCandy bag is too gorgeous to risk spoiling it!

I’d ordered 2 nappy buckets (one for the nursery, one for downstairs) and they’ve arrived so one less thing to buy. I’ve found quite a few hats in our donated clothes piles, plus some gorgeous snowsuits!

So what’s left?

From Boots:

  • Nipple cream
  • Wipes
  • Cotton wool
  • Sponges / baby flannel
  • Baby bath (holding off on the gorgeous flower one at the moment…)
  • Sudocreme

From somewhere (!):

  • Bedding sheets
  • Grobags
  • Child-view mirror and sun-blinds for the car
  • Waterproof bag for nappies
  • 5 nursing bras – leaving this as late as possible
  • Strappy tops in a couple of sizes too big – to use for feeding, instead of belly bands
  • Nursing pillow
  • 2nd changing mat
  • Morrck hoodie / T&C star wrap (keeping an eye on ebay)
  • Carbon monoxide alarms
  • Extra fire alarms

Phew! Countdown to maternity leave now, and then I’ll get some shopping in!

Project Nursery – nearly finished!

Well, it’s been a busy week! The second coat of Turtle Seas went up and hubby glossed all of the skirting. We had a change of plan with printing the stars and decided that stencilling would give a better finished; we were concerned that if a print didn’t work properly, it would be a bit nightmarish to re-align the printing block for a second coat / attempt.

We got some stencilling acetate sheets and carefully drew out 5 slightly different sized regular stars on paper, and then cut out each stencil by following the patterns with a surgical blade. I marked out on the wall where each star should go (just a pencil initial for each colour) and away we went – using a decorator’s sponge to sponge the colour through the stencil and layering the colours as necessary. It was a pretty long job but I’m thrilled with the result!

Finally finished! Personally I like it a lot more than the M&P wallpaper which is slightly dull in comparison.

Finally finished! Personally I like it a lot more than the M&P wallpaper which is slightly dull in comparison.

The wooden seat / shelf to go over the stairs-box had been cut to size, undercoated and given one coat of white gloss. We screwed it down and gave it another coat of gloss, hiding the screws in the process. The IKEA expedit unit went up, with it’s pink and blue boxes and looks great! Then we scrubbed the floor, moved the cot in and finished painting it, and moved the drawers (with changing unit) and [temporary] bookshelf in.

The cotbed was a hand-me-down from my sister and although it was in good condition, it was quite dark pine and just didn’t fit with our planned theme. We therefore sanded it right back to bare wood, gave it 2 coats of white undercoat (it really was quite dark and took some covering up!) and then 2 coats of ‘Light Rain’ wooden gloss paint. The mattress went in and then, even though we have 2 months to wait, we couldn’t resist adding the musical mobile, toys and the coverlet!

The finished cot!

The finished cot!

I’ll do a new blog entry on how I modified the drawers, but in the meantime, here are some photo flashes. The bookshelf couldn’t be painted grey as I had hoped (it’s not real wood and has a horrible plastic coating) so that is temporary until we get something else. The bunting needs finishing and I’d like to make some wall art for the plain white walls. Radiator needs to be re-hung and the new piping needs painting white. We’re also buying a couple more coloured boxes to go on top of the expedit unit, and finally we’re having a second hand chair that will be refurbished to match everything else. THEN we’ll be finished!

One of the pram / car-seat toys

One of the pram / car-seat toys.

 

Part of the musical mobile.

Part of the musical mobile.

Top of the mobile.

Top of the mobile.

Chime hedgehog on top of the temporary bookshelf.

Chime hedgehog on top of the temporary bookshelf.

Rabbit perched on the corner of the changing top - I'm so pleased with how well matched the colours are with the M&P items and our DIY stuff!

Rabbit perched on the corner of the changing top – I’m so pleased with how well matched the colours are with the M&P items and our DIY stuff!

DSC_0457

The cot from a different angle, showing the mobile and coverlet.

 

The modified drawers with changing table on top.

The modified drawers with changing table on top.

 

And finally, one view of the room showing the expedit unit (replacing the brick-built wardrobe), starry wall and drawers.

And finally, one view of the room showing the expedit unit (replacing the brick-built wardrobe), starry wall and drawers.

 

 

 

Sling the baby!

Maybe not the motto I should shout, in case it gets misinterpreted. As you may have guessed, today’s research is slings / wraps / baby carriers. I am beginning to understand how new horse owners must feel when they have to buy an entire wardrobe of tack / rugs / clothing for a new horse and are faced with a zillion brands and choices. Easy enough when you’ve been surrounded by it for years, but somewhat overwhelming for a newbie.

The way I see it, there are 3 broad categories:

Carriers

Baby Bjorn carrier

My gut feeling is that, on the whole, these are Not Good. A typical example would be the BabyBjorn range. I have heard them referred to as ‘crotch danglers’, which although amusing, doesn’t conjure up images of comfort. More importantly, I am concerned about the hip and spinal development of a young child in these carriers. It’s not so much how the legs are forced apart – although that’s not great either – but the way the legs dangle which not only places excess weight on the hip joints, but forces the child to brace their back in order to support the dangle – trust me, try it yourself. Sit on top of a fence or gate, with your feet resting on one of the bars. Make sure your spine is in neutral position (seatbones pointing down, soft curve in your back, shoulders over hips, abdominals engaged). Now take your feet off the support and let your legs dangle – hello braced spine!

So traditional high street type carriers are out.

The Connecta baby carriers seem a little better for the baby, and I think might be a good option for older children but they’re limiting for newborns as there is only one position safe for them. All of the other positions are on the back, which rely on the baby being able to support their heads and sit up unaided. They’re also a bit pricey (imho) at £62, given the limited positions.

Slings

The Maya ring sling

These seem better for the baby. I’m quite taken with the Baba Sling as it allows a variety of position (including breastfeeding) and appears to be quite sturdy and easy to use. However, it’s one-sided and I think it would eventually cause me quite a bit of shoulder pain (I already have a damaged left shoulder from years of carrying a textbook-laden school bag on the left side!) They seem reasonably priced (£40) and come in a range of pretty colours.

Then there’s the ring slings. Again, they result in a one-shouldered carry which does put me off slightly, but the ring slings appear to have more versatility in terms of positioning on the wearer – like making the shoulder material cover a wider area. There’s some great information on the Little Possums website – click here for a link to their ring sling info. I like the look of the the padded Maya (the rainbow fabric is just gorgeous!) and at £52 isn’t a bad price. The Ellaroo is very similar (lightly padded shoulder, fab colours, same price) but I can’t help but feel the fringed ends of the tails make them a little ‘girly’ and I can’t see my husband being keen to wear it!

The last sling that I like the look of is sold as a pouch (shoulder) sling, but actually consists of two pouches in one so it goes over both shoulders and provides much better support for the wearer. It’s the Tricotti sling and is £48. A few colours to choose from, and no rings or tying to worry about. There are only 3 positions though, and one of those is facing out which is not recommended.

Wraps

The Cozy Wrap

These are basically long pieces of material that can be wrapped around the baby and wearer and tied in a variety of ways. They are split into two rough categories – stretchy wraps and woven wraps.

Stretchy wraps: these seem to have a more limited life than the woven wraps – they start to ‘give’ more as the baby gets heavier and this can pull on the wearer (and I would guess the baby?) They are generally thought to be ok for up to 6 months, or possibly up to a year in a hip carry position. They’re meant to be dead easy for the novice wrapper to use, because you can tie them and then pop the baby in – the stretchy fabric means more flexibility for stretching round the baby, rather than having to tie to the perfect sized pocket. I like the look of…

Woven wraps: there is some give and flex through the weave of the fabric, but they don’t ‘stretch’ as such. They are apparently a little trickier to tie because for some positions you need to wrap and tie them around the baby, instead of being able to tie them first. There are some really stunning woven wraps out there – for silly money as well! The ones I’ve found and like the look of within a more reasonable budget are…

Brain organising

Oh lovely lists, how you calm and focus me.

Unless you’re 3 miles long and I have 52 – sorry, make that 51 now – days to check you off.

Image credit to The Girl In Pink Shoes.

Time to make another [shorter] list – this time, just what is left to buy / find / beg / borrow.

Sleeping…

  • At least 4 sheets for each sleeping place – ie 4 for the hammock and 4 for the carrycot. I think we have some, in a box in the loft.
  • Grobags (special baby sleeping bags) – we may have inherited a couple. Need to find them, find out what tog they are and size etc.
  • Black-out blind. We already have one in our room, but will need one in the nursery for later.

Out and about…

  • Child-view mirror and some sun-blinds for the back seats are recommended for car travel.
  • Sling. Investigate local ‘sling libraries’ but I also think we’ve been given one.
  • Need to check the changing bag has a truly waterproof section for soggy reusable nappies – if not, we’ll need a waterproof bag to pop inside the main changing bag.

Feeding…

  • Nursing bras – a challenge, given the large bra size I had pre-pregnancy. I’ve bought one so far but it’s advisable to leave the shopping as late as possible to try and get the best size. Several bras are needed (approx 5, to include nights) as they can get milky and manky. Nice.
  • Nursing-friendly tops and/or belly bands 
  • Cream for sore nipples
  • Nursing pillow

Changing…

  • Changing mat – a second one, for downstairs.
  • Nappy bucket with lid – preferably 2 (upstairs and downstairs).
  • Wipes – wet wipes (disposable) or reusable – I think we’ll go disposable, the idea of washing the number of wipes that are likely to be used is pretty exhausting.
  • Cotton wool
  • Potty – clearly not for training a newborn, but useful to plonk a wet nappy on until it can be dealt with, rather than on the carpet. The corner of the changing mat is an option, but as the baby gets bigger and more prone to limb-flinging, I can see this being a bad idea!
  • Soothing / healing / protective creams – often sudocreme is recommended, but I want to check out others as well.

Cleaning and grooming…

  • Soft sponges or baby flannel for washing either in the bath or giving a sponge bath.
  • Baby bath. A normal one with a stand, or the giant flower. Decisions!

Entertainment…

  • Bath toys
  • Baby books

Clothes…

  • 2 x pairs of scratch mitts
  • Hats
  • Snowsuit
  • Morrck hoodie / T&C star wrap

Health and safety… (yes, the buggers even get a mention in my blog.)

  • Fire alarms. We have 2 installed but could do with some more.
  • Carbon monoxide alarms.
  • First aid kit, suitable for baby, including infacol and a good quality digital ear thermometer.

All the gear… but no idea

This would be me, had I actually bought all the gear. The fact is, there is so much ‘stuff’ out there that the retailers would have new parents-to-be believe is essential just to keep your baby alive, that it is pretty difficult to know where to begin.

I’ve read ‘must have’ lists all over the place and keep meaning to write my own, and then I get scared and stop. With a mere 73 days until due date (eek!) and just 52 days until my baby is technically fully cooked and could easily arrive at any moment, it’s time my husband and I pulled our fingers out and did my favourite thing – Wrote A List.

How many ‘essentials’ are really essential? Image credit to http://www.theocdlifestyle.com

So here goes – gulp. This list has been compiled from various searches on the internet (including the NHS website) and advice from family and friends. It’s a list for us and our set up – there may be things on it not relevant to others (like cat nets to stop the furries from snuggling in with baby!) and it may not have things on that you might need, such as formula (I am intending to breastfeed). That said, if you have discovered any amazing items that you can’t imagine surviving the newborn-months without, please do share them!

Sleeping…

  • Cotbed – eventually. We want to keep the baby with us for all sleeping for the first 6 months minimum, as the SIDS guidelines suggest (see this fab guidance from The Lullaby Trust) so no cotbed sleeping for our little one to start with, but we still want to be prepared for later!
  • Somewhere to sleep at night, in our room. We dithered for ages about crib vs moses basket, but what we eventually discovered and decided on was a baby hammock. My nephews slept in an Amby Hammock and we have been lucky to inherit it. You can read more about them here.
  • Somewhere to sleep during the day. We can move the hammock around if we want, but mainly I think we’ll be using a pram carrycot, a sling, and my chest! I’ll come back to slings later…
  • At least 4 sheets for each sleeping place – ie 4 for the hammock and 4 for the carrycot.
  • A selection of lightweight blankets – ideally the cellular ones, which can be layered for more warmth – approx 4.
  • We fancy giving grobags (special baby sleeping bags) a go, too. Apparently 2 x 1-tog and 2 x 2.5-tog is a good start.
  • Room thermometer – we’re hoping to get a Gro Egg (so pretty…)
  • Monitors – not essential straight off as – in theory, the baby will always be with someone – but it won’t be long before we’ll need them.
  • Black-out blind. We already have one in our room, but will need one in the nursery for later.

Out and about…

  • A baby car seat. We have isofix in our cars and so wanted to get an isofix compatible car seat / base. We have ended up with a Maxi Cosi Cabriofix and bought the Easyfix isofix base. Husband assures me this is all exceptionally easy to click into place, and is also foolproof with colour coding to make sure you have it in place safely.
  • Whilst not essential, a child-view mirror and some sun-blinds for the back seats are recommended for car travel.
  • Pushchair or pram. Oh my goodness, the choices! Based on information I’d read, we decided that we wanted a pushchair with chassis that could be used from birth to approx. 3yrs, with a reversible seat (parent facing or outside-world facing) and a model that we could also buy a compatible carrycot for use in the first 6 months. We wanted a carrycot that was safe for daytime sleeping and even occasional overnight sleeping (ideal for the odd night away in the early days) and – because we appear to be part magpies – we wanted something pretty and shiny. It also had to be easy to put up and put down, fit in the car easily, not toooo heavy (they are all fairly heavy if you also want sturdy), suitable for occasional off-roading (we have horses so will need to go across the fields sometimes) and easy to steer. Moon on a stick, anyone? Online, I fell in love with the iCandy range. Our budget was not going to stretch that far though, and after a bit of investigating and trialling in stores, we had almost settled on the Mamas & Papas Sola model, with the carry cot. However, fate stepped in (oh, and eBay…) and I found the bargain of the century – an iCandy Peach pushchair with carrycot and accessories (parasol, cup holder, spare pushchair seat cover, car seat adaptors, rain covers and I’m sure some more!) in a gorgeous, vibrant blue and lime green called ‘sweetpea‘. We couldn’t resist, and when we went to try it, it was even easy to handle, collapse and so on than the Sola. Result!
  • Baby carrier or sling. I was put off most of the baby carriers as they’re pretty rigid and force the baby’s legs apart which isn’t great for the hips. What I really want is one of the stretchy fabric slings. We haven’t research this properly yet so not sure where to start, but apparently many areas have a ‘sling library’ so you can try different types and see what works best for you and your baby.
  • Changing bag with folding changing mat plus all the usual nappy change essentials (when I figure out what they are…) We’ve just ordered an iCandy one in ‘sweetpea’ as it’s huge, matches the pram, and was a half price bargain in the sale. There are, again, hundreds to choose from in every price bracket. If I had the money, I could have got really silly here! Once it arrives, we need to check it has a truly waterproof section for soggy reusable nappies – if not, we’ll need a waterproof bag to pop inside the main changing bag.

Feeding…

  • As I mentioned above, we hope to breastfeed. Eventually we’ll get an electric pump (in fact, I think we’ve inherited one from a family member) but unless we have a particular issue (for example needing to express so we can syringe-feed) then expressing to bottle feed isn’t recommended in the early days. Along with this we’ll need milk storage bags, sterilisers, bottles, teats… I’ll worry about that later!
  • Nursing bras – a challenge, given the large bra size I had pre-pregnancy. I’ve bought one so far but it’s advisable to leave the shopping as late as possible to try and get the best size. Several bras are needed (approx 5, to include nights) as they can get milky and manky. Nice.
  • Nursing-friendly tops – gah, more shopping. Clothes that seem to triple in price purely because they are maternity / nursing. I am tempted to buy a few Belly Bands which fit from under-bust to hip, and mean you can just hitch up your normal top for breastfeeding and these clever garments keep your tummy well covered – a fact that any members of the public in sight when I feed will be grateful for.
  • Breast pads – I’ve already bought from gorgeously soft bamboo pads from Little Lamb, which are washable, but I think that disposable ones would be handy for when leakage is a real problem (often in the early days of feeding).
  • Muslin squares – mopping up me, mopping up baby, covering my modesty – I am assured these are one of the best bits of baby kit ever.
  • Cream for sore nipples – lansinoh is often recommended, but some find it too thick. More research needed!
  • Nursing pillow – not only useful for a constantly-feeding baby, but apparently can be a comfy seat post-birth when everything down south is still a little tender.
  • Nipple shields – generally not recommended, if you can help it… however, as with all things, they have their place and can help a difficult latch. I am in two minds as to whether to buy these in advance as it may be too tempting to use them when not strictly needed and it can be difficult to stop using them then. And quite frankly, I’m lazy – and nipple shields cause additional work through sterilising.
  • Nursing chair. This will live in the nursery and will be useful if I need to feed in the middle of the night and can’t risk disturbing poor hubby – although once feeding is established, I’m hoping I can stay lying down in bed, feed, and then pop baby straight back in the hammock.

Changing…

  • Changing mat – a main one for at home (which we have got) but I’m thinking a second one would be useful as I am, as previously mentioned, lazy and I can’t imagine trucking upstairs for every nappy change.
  • Changing table – hand made by hubby!
  • Nappies – we’re going reusable. So far, we have a mix of TotsBots stretchies, Little Lamb bamboos, Bumgenius freetime and motherease wraps. I knew nothing about cloth nappies before I started investigating and found The Nappy Lady an amazing source of advice – and she often has good offers on her website, too. We also have some liners and boosters.
  • Nappy bucket with lid – preferably 2 (upstairs and downstairs).
  • Wipes – wet wipes (disposable) or reusable – I think we’ll go disposable, the idea of washing the number of wipes that are likely to be used is pretty exhausting.
  • Cotton wool
  • Potty – clearly not for training a newborn, but useful to plonk a wet nappy on until it can be dealt with, rather than on the carpet. The corner of the changing mat is an option, but as the baby gets bigger and more prone to limb-flinging, I can see this being a bad idea!
  • Soothing creams – often sudocreme is recommended, but I want to check out others as well.

Cleaning and grooming…

  • Top ‘n’ tails bowl. Easy peasy purchase.
  • Towels. I really like those cute little hoodie ones, they look so snuggly!
  • Soft sponges or baby flannel for washing either in the bath or giving a sponge bath.
  • Nail clippers / scissors – which will scare the life out of me when in close proximity to teeny tiny fingers. Eek!
  • Baby bath. I am torn between a bath with stand (my knees are shocking and I can’t kneel at all) or one of the gorgeously cute Blooming Bath flowers, to use in the kitchen sink. If I’m honest, I think the flower will win… Apparently a bath thermometer is also recommended, but what’s wrong with the old fashioned elbow dip test?
  • Baby hairbrush / comb. I am not entirely convinced that these are necessary for a newborn, but I’m prepared to be convinced otherwise… ditto toothbrush and toothpaste. I mean, really?

Entertainment…

  • Bouncer
  • Babygym or nest
  • Cot mobile
  • Musical toys
  • Textured toys
  • Bath toys
  • Pram toys
  • Baby books

Clothes…

  • 6-8 x babygros (all-in-ones) for day and night
  • 4 x vests
  • 2 x cardigans (cotton or wool)
  • Shawl or blanket
  • 3 x pairs of socks
  • 2 x pairs of scratch mitts
  • Hats, gloves, booties and a coat if the weather is cold – maybe snowsuit?
  • Sun hat if the weather is hot (not a concern for an October baby!)
  • Morrck hoodie and/or Tuppence & Crumble star wrap

Health and safety… (yes, the buggers even get a mention in my blog.)

  • Fire alarms. We have 2 installed but could do with some more.
  • Carbon monoxide alarms.
  • Plug socket covers. Not essential until little one is mobile, but worth thinking about.
  • Stair-gates. Again, not necessary for the baby just yet, but it could be useful for keeping the dog in one part of the house, eg out of the kitchen during bath time.
  • Fire guard. Check.
  • First aid kit, suitable for baby, including infacol and a good quality digital ear thermometer.

Now I must go and lie down in a darkened room having realised how many things we still need to buy – and also knowing this list is probably not yet complete!

Nappies. The choices!

I want to use ‘real’ nappies – ie reusable ones. I’ve never really considered that we might use disposables – I guess because my parents used old fashioned Terry’s squares with all of us, and my sister used cloth nappies with both of her children, so it seems like the norm to me.

I like the fact they are softer on the baby’s skin – would you really opt for paper pants over cotton ones for yourself? They save money in the long run, are meant to help with potty training, and are better for the environment – yes, even taking into account the additional water and electricity needed to wash them.

But the choices! Wow!

As much as I love google, in this case, I didn’t know where to begin. Somebody then recommended The Nappy Lady, guru of all things related to cloth nappies! Her website in itself is hugely informative and I was relieved to see that products have moved on significantly since the days of large squares of cotton towelling to try and fold, and giant nappy pins that seem lethal when combined with the flailing limbs of an uncooperative infant. Nappies now are usually shaped, elasticated even, with poppers and velcro. Hurrah! They even come in pretty colours… this was immediately looking like it might be an expensive addiction.

Lovely colourful prints available!

The Nappy Lady offers an amazing advice service – all for free! I had to fill in a comprehensive questionnaire including information about:

  • Whether I had children already
  • Whether I planned to have more children in the future (to use cloth nappies with)
  • Laundry facilities
  • Priorities of nappy features – eg quick drying, non-leaking, aesthetics, ease of use, natural fabrics – all of which I had to rate in order of priority

I then got a detailed recommendation list back, explaining not only what she suggested would suit us as a family the best, but why. The recommendations I have received are (in brief):

  • Bamboozle Stretch – these are the main nappy bit, with elasticated legs for better fit and reduction of leaks, and as they are all shaped they are supposedly easy to put on.
  • Motherease Rikki Wraps – these are the waterproof outer layer to put over the main nappy.
  • Triple-layer boosters – basically cloth pads to pop inside the nappy, particularly overnight, for extra absorbency.
  • Bumgenius Freetime – all-in-one nappy (not a 2-parter) for daytime use only – they’re not as good absorbency / containment wise, but would be easy to put on when out and about or for the in-laws who are pro-disposables.

Lots to think about, more research to be done, and excuses for shopping lie ahead!